Malaysian Lamb Curry with Cilantro and Mint

Malaysian_Lamb_Curry2 (1 of 1)I’m on a bit of a lamb kick at the moment, so I tried this very interesting Malaysian lamb dish last night. Malaysian cuisine is influenced by cuisines from around the world, but it is particularly influenced by its Malay, Chinese and Indian ethnic groups. This dish is a delicious Malaysian spin on Indian Lamb Korma. The unique balance of spices and herbs, and the use of ghee are what make this dish! I hope you’ll try it!

2 inches (1 oz) fresh ginger, peeled and grated
4 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped
2 – 3 red Thai chilies, seeded and minced
2 tsp garam masala
2 tsp ground coriander
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp ground turmeric
1 1/2 lbs boneless lamb leg, trimmed and cut into 1-inch cubes
3 Tbsp ghee (clarified butter)
2 medium onions, peeled, halved lengthwise and sliced
1/2 tsp sugar
6 cardamom pods, lightly crushed
1 cinnamon stick
1 14-oz can coconut milk
2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp ground black pepper
2 Tbsp roasted peanuts, chopped
Handful fresh cilantro, chopped
Handful fresh mint leaves, chopped

In a small food processor (or mortar and pestle), grind ginger, garlic and chilies to a fine paste. Stir in the garam masala, ground coriander, cumin and turmeric.

In a medium bowl, combine the lamb cubes and the garlic mixture well, ensuring that every Malaysian_Lamb_Curry1 (1 of 1)cube is coated. Cover and let stand in the refrigerator for one hour.

Heat ghee in a Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add the onions and sugar, and cook until caramelized, about 20 minutes.

Stir in the cardamom pods, cinnamon stick and lamb with its marinade. Brown the lamb, stirring for 4 minutes.

Stir in the coconut milk and bring mixture to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer gently until meat is tender, about 1 hour. Season to taste with additional salt and black pepper. Serve over steamed jasmine rice. Garnish each serving with the chopped peanuts, cilantro and mint.

Serves 4.

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6 thoughts on “Malaysian Lamb Curry with Cilantro and Mint

  1. Hari Qhuang

    We got a name for the hybrid “culture” (Malay, Indian, Chinese, a bit of British and a bit of Dutch). It’s called as “Peranakan”, a term I keep mentioning on my blog. 😀
    This recipe is very interesting. Some of the ingredients are rarely used in Peranakan style curry in Indonesia. I think I should try it. 😀

    Reply
    1. AnotherDish Post author

      Thanks, Hari. I find the “hybrid” cultures of the Malay Peninsula and Indonesia very fascinating, and they add to the wonderful cuisines! Again, let me know what you think of this one when you get around to trying it.

      Reply

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