Chicken Saltimbocca

Chicken_SaltimboccaThis dish is popular in northern Italy and Switzerland, but there are several variations around the Mediterranean. “Saltimbocca” means “jumps in your mouth,” and for very good reason — this dish is so simple and delicious, once you try it, you’ll understand why! In general, saltimbocca is a meat, such as veal or chicken, wrapped with sage leaves and prosciutto. It’s typically served with simple sauce, cooked in the same skillet as you cook the meat (hardly ever can go wrong with that). Very good — hope you’ll try it tonight!

4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, pounded between sheets of plastic wrap with a mallet to about 1/3rd inches in thickness
Salt
Pepper
12 fresh sage leaves
8 very thin slices prosciutto (about 3 ounces)
1/2 cup and 2 tsp flour, divided
1 Tbsp butter
1 1/2 Tbsp olive oil
2 Tbsp dry white wine
1/2 cup chicken stock
2 Tbsp lemon juice
1 Tbsp chopped parsley for garnish

Sprinkle each breast with plenty of salt and pepper on both sides. Place 3 sage leaves on top of each breast, then place prosciutto on top (enough to cover the top of each breast in a single layer), pressing to adhere — if it’s thin enough, it will stick should stick like plastic wrap.

Place 1/2 cup of the flour in a shallow dish. Gently dredge each breast, shaking off excess flour.

Melt butter and oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Once foam subsides, place each breast, prosciutto-side down, into skillet. Cook 4 minutes, then gently turn over and cook an additional 3 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.

Whisk wine and last 2 tsp flour in a small bowl. Add broth, lemon juice and wine mixture to the same skillet. Whisk until sauce thickens a bit. Remove from heat. Season with salt and pepper.

Place chicken breasts on individual plates. Top each with a bit of the lemon-wine sauce and garnish with chopped parsley. Here I served the chicken with steamed asparagus and orange and thyme-scented orzo (the recipe for which, I’ll blog about soon because it’s so delicious!).

Serves 4.

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2 thoughts on “Chicken Saltimbocca

    1. AnotherDish Post author

      Thanks, Chef Mimi! I always prefer to flatten chicken breasts to an even thickness, even for grilling – it’s much easier for me to gauge doneness.

      Reply

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